Buying an Older Home: HVAC System Checklist

Buying an Older Home: HVAC System Checklist

Learn what to look out for when buying an older home with this gas furnace and air conditioning system troubleshooting guide from Trane.

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Depending on where you plan to buy property, you could be shopping for homes that are 50 or even 100 years old. And while some of these homes’ HVAC systems will have been upgraded, many will have older furnaces or air conditioning systems. Here are a few things to consider when buying an older home, or a home with an old HVAC system.

Older gas furnaces

As with any home purchase, make sure to have the furnace checked by a certified technician during the home inspection. That person should be able to tell you the condition of the older furnace, and any potential repairs or costs you could face in the near future.

If the technician recommends installing a new system, call your local Trane Comfort Specialist for a free evaluation and cost estimate. With your realtor’s help, you may even be able to subtract all or part of the cost of the furnace from the seller’s asking price.

If the existing furnace does pass inspection, have it rechecked annually, and keep your family safe by installing carbon monoxide detectors in your home.

Air conditioning systems in older homes

Since many older homes do not have air conditioning systems, you may be wondering how much it will cost to install a new central air conditioner. Your local Trane Comfort Specialist can help you make an informed decision by put together a quote, including the cost of installation, labor and equipment. Keep in mind that some older homes have electric or steam radiant heat. If that’s the case, and your home has no ductwork, you have a couple options:

Ductwork can be installed throughout your home. While this can be an invasive and expensive option, you can work with your contractor to minimize the ductwork’s visibility, while still efficiently moving air to all parts of the house.
You may also opt for a ductless cooling system. As the name suggests, these systems do not require ducts, but rather run small refrigerant and drainage lines from an outdoor unit to one or more indoor units.

Even if the home does have an existing central air conditioning system, you may still consider replacing it. Older air conditioners are usually less efficient than Trane’s newer models, and replacing old systems could result in significant energy savings over the life of the system. Check out Trane Air Conditioner SEER ratings to compare energy efficiency of different models.

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